Category Archive: Aerospace Medicine

Aerospace Medicine International – Collaborative Effort for Safer Skies

An association of like-minded practitioners of aerospace medicine amongst the Indian diaspora has come together to work towards aviation safety. It is ‘Aerospace Medicine International’ or AMI. AMI depends upon the spirit of volunteering and pooling of their respective expertise to work towards the following goals:- To support training, education, and research in the broad …

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G Force – What is?

‘G’ is the ratio between a given acceleration and the acceleration due to gravity. The term ‘G force’ is used sometimes to describe a force, which produced acceleration, which is a multiple of the acceleration due to gravity (9.81 m/sq sec). Thus, an acceleration of 98.1 m/sq sec would be 10 G. High sustained G, …

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Exhilarating when Accelerating in Air!

A fast jet can move rapidly on ground, taking off into the medium of air where it can be manoeuvered in flight by the aerodynamic forces generated by the thrust of its engine and manoeuvrability by swift-responding control surfaces. Such movements of the aircraft affect its occupants, the aircrew (pilots and weapons system operators) due …

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Hypoxia Training – Essentially Useful.

Most military aircrew undergo hypoxia training, including experience in decompression chamber, to understand the ill-effects of the silent but deadly hazard of in-flight hypoxia [1]. Symptoms experienced during the classic mask-off hypoxia indoctrination in altitude/decompression chamber correlates well with reported in-flight symptoms [2]. The objectives of hypoxia indoctrination, an effects-based training, is to make aircrew …

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Cabin Pressurisation – Hazards of Rapid Decompression

Incidence of failure of cabin pressurisation in military aircraft, even in peace time, is higher than commercial aviation. The commonest cause of loss of pressurisation in military aviation, especially in fighter flying, is engine flameout.

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Cabin Pressurisation – If Lost?

On 10 Jun 1990, on BA flight 5390, Captain Tim Lancaster was sucked out halfway out of the aircraft, when an improperly installed windscreen pane failed. While the first officer made an emergency landing in Southampton, the cabin crew firmly held on to Tim, bringing him down safely [*].

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Cabin Pressurisation – The Mechanism

It is not practical to maintain sea level conditions in flight. For example, a cabin differential pressure of 1 Kg/sq cm (nearly 1 ATA) generates more than 1,000 gm/cm2 pressure on the cabin wall and the transparency. If the cabin altitude of 2,500 m (8,000 ft) is accepted,the pressure differential would now be reduced by …

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Cabin Pressurisation – An Introduction

On 26 January 2011, a Qantas Boeing 737-400 made an emergency descent of about 8000m [*], when the aircraft lost cabin pressure after about 30 minutes of flight. This flight, with 99 passengers, from Adelaide to Melbourne had oxygen masks dropping in the cabin, causing a scare amongst its 99 passengers. 



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Say NO! To Self-Medication: First a few basics…

Temptation to arrest, say, the beginning of a seasonal viral illness must be very strong in almost every pilot, civil or military. This may be to go ahead with the planned trip or sortie next morning. Invariably this may happen due to compulsions of the job or one’s personal training needs. But such a temptation …

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Do Flight Simulators help in Transfer of Learning?

Despite the wide scale acceptance and use of flight simulators, some doubts may continue being raised about their limitations in the transfer of learning, especially whenever there is an aircraft accident. 

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