Category Archive: CRM

Contrasting Outcomes in Multiteam Systems – Part 5

Lessons from the study – Selection and training of MTS aircrew The findings of Bienefeld and Grote’s study has implications for selection and training of crew to perform within and across teams for enhanced aviation safety [3]. The salient points were:- Selection of MTS aircrews is to be based on the leadership potential of the …

Continue reading »

Contrasting Outcomes in Multiteam Systems – Part 4

What does Bienefeld & Grote’s Study on Multiteam Systems (MTS) say? Bienefeld and Grote [3] conducted a study on 84 cockpit and cabin crews (n = 504), simulating an in-flight emergency in a high fidelity simulator with two-man cockpit and a fully furnished passenger cabin. Their aim was “to examine the effect of shared leadership …

Continue reading »

Contrasting Outcomes in Multiteam Systems – Part 3

Shared Leadership in Multiteam systems During an on board emergency, despite their differing roles and responsibilities, the crew work interdependently with the primary objective to protect and save lives of all passengers and crew on board, after the aircraft has landed safely. The shared goal of safety during the dynamic and stressful environment of an …

Continue reading »

Contrasting Outcomes in Multiteam Systems – Part 2

Air France Flight 358 – 02 August 2005 [2] What Happened? It was an Airbus A340-313, which departed Paris, France on a scheduled flight to Toronto, Ontario, Canada with 297 passengers and 12 crew members on board. Thunderstorms were forecasted at Toronto prior to its departure, and while approaching, the crew was advised of weather-related …

Continue reading »

Contrasting Outcomes in Multiteam Systems – Lessons from Air Canada 797 and Air France 358 accidents

In commercial aviation, there are two teams at work during flight: cockpit crew and cabin crew. The former being led by the captain who also has the overall responsibility of the flight, with the first officer/co-pilot as a member in the cockpit. The purser leads the flight attendants in the cabin. The formal leadership roles …

Continue reading »

Who failed in Crash of Flight IX-812? Part 2

Various factors defining the success or failure in a multi-crew operations depend on communication, situational awareness, problem solving, decision making, judgement, leadership – followership, stress management, critique and interpersonal skills [2, 3]. In this tragic accident flawed decision making affected good judgement, leading to deliberately compromised situational awareness, aggravated by self-imposed stress and perceived workload …

Continue reading »

Loss of Control: Human Factors in Air France Flight 447

Investigating the crash of Air France Flight 447 [1], from Rio de Janeiro to Paris, into the Atlantic Ocean on 01 June 2009, the French Bureau of Enquiry and Analysis for Civil Aviation Safety (BEA = Bureau d’Enquêtes et d’Analyses pour la Sécurité de l’Aviation Civile) released an interim report on 29 Jul 11. This …

Continue reading »

Reality Check – CRM in Single Cockpit

Human Error in combat flying continues to the greatest cause of accidents [1], with the trends remaining, more or less, stagnant. Commonest causes for aircraft mishap are [2]:- (a) Loss of situational awareness (LOSA): LOSA leads to disorientation, mid-air collision, flight into terrain, getting lost and running out of fuel, wheels up landing, flight into bad …

Continue reading »